Girls’ football match continues despite rain

Junior+Kayla+Pak+%28right%29+scores+a+touchdown+in+the+annual+junior+vs.+senior+Powderpuff+game+on+April+8%2C+a+game+which+ended+in+a+tie.

CALVIN RU

Junior Kayla Pak (right) scores a touchdown in the annual junior vs. senior Powderpuff game on April 8, a game which ended in a tie.

Yusheng Xia , Editor in Chief

Cold temperatures  and light drizzle  did not stop the Lady Brahmas from grabbing their gear and heading out for Diamond Bar High School’s sixth annual Powderpuff Game last Friday.  After more than an hour of friendly flag football competition, neither team was able to come up on top, with  the game ending in a tie,  two touchdowns each.

“It was really competitive. We were kind of harsh toward each other but other than that, it was really fun. It was a new experience,” junior participant Gabrielle Niko said.

Most of the girls who signed up to participate in the game were from different athletic organizations on  campus. The referees  were all volunteer football coaches and many football players were assigned as coaches for their respective classes.

“We did a lot of different things, mostly just drills that would help them in the position that they played,” senior football player Kyle Yada said. “They were all coachable and super cool to be around.”

However, due to the weather conditions and its effect on the field, the game did not last as long as it has in prior years.

“Playing in the rain was really fun but it made it quite hard because it made the turf slippery. I was quite disappointed the game was shorter than it was supposed to be,” senior Jillian Aluning said.

The Powderpuff game was first played  at DBHS  in 2010 as a  fundraiser  for Pep. However, this year’s game was more about developing class bonds—with juniors facing the seniors—and  having fun, according to senior Jasmine Thrower, who was in charge of planning the event.

“The purpose of the game is so that each class can start bonding and play a fun game together that we aren’t familiar with,” Thrower said. “There [were] no fundraising motives.”